It All Starts with a Seed

Three students met together for Bible study and fellowship and to encourage one another in their Christian walks. The University Discipleship Movement in East Africa began at Kampala International University in Uganda with that seed in 2002. The students met only once a week and each attended their own churches on Sundays.

As time went on, more students joined the fellowship and other groups began to form. Eventually, the students started United Faith Chapel, a thriving community of believers and a full-fledged, student-led church in Kampala.

But God’s transforming work did not stop in Kampala. As the ministries at United Faith Chapel grew, students at other universities throughout East Africa asked the church to help them create their own student-led ministries, leading to the expansion of UDM. WGM is a part of this student-led movement, and Jonathan Mayo is one missionary who is very passionate and excited for how UDM is spreading throughout East Africa.

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Photo credit: Mayos

In the Mayos’ latest newsletter, Jonathan stated, “Our passion is to disciple and mentor students who will transform their world for Jesus Christ.”

“We have been blessed to see God’s kingdom grow during our years in Uganda. We have seen the missionary force grow, the church grow, Heritage International School grow, and the university ministries grow. In the last few years, our focus has been on students, both in universities and at Heritage. Students are growing closer to Jesus and are being challenged to be change agents for Him in their communities and countries. Heritage has students from over 25 countries. On the 20 university campuses where we work, the students represent at least 11 African countries. The mission field has come to us as we disciple and mentor these students. They have the potential to return to their home countries and bring transformation to their nations. Some who have graduated are now serving as lawyers, pastors, doctors, politicians, missionaries, and teachers. The potential for their impact is limitless!”

Praise God for this amazing ministry WGM is so fortunate to be a part of! If you would like to join WGM in helping the University Discipleship Movement, look at the action steps below to find out how you can partner with us to make a difference in lives in Africa.

GIVE: Help provide Bibles, Bible study materials, books on leadership, and other needed materials for UDM. Make checks payable to World Gospel Mission and write account #150-21343 on the memo line. Send check donations to:

World Gospel Mission
P.O. Box 948
Marion, IN 46952-0948

MORE: Learn more about UDM Africa.

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Photo credit: Mayos

Textbook Perfect

Scared for their son, Ezra, but trusting in God, Nathan and Jade Metz were stuck between trusting in God and fearing the unknown. With nightmares waking and thoughts of what could be, the journey has not been without its challenges. What would their son be like after his brain surgery? The answer is in the title of this post, but it is also so much more. Read on to learn as Nathan tells how God performed a miracle in little Ezra’s life.

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Photo credit: Nathan and Jade Metz

“Among our children we’ve witnessed optimism and hope that builds such powerful encouragement and strength within us. Prior to the surgery they said things like, ‘Today is the day Ezra will be healed!’ and ‘Ezra just had the final seizure of his life.’ It does Jade and I a lot of good to hear such positive, faith-filled perspective from our children. Jade and I have handled the process in our own ways with ups and downs, highs and lows. This morning I testify.

“God’s promises are full and final. He does not struggle to remain faithful to us. His love is complete. Less than 48 hours after his surgery, Ezra has no bandage on his head, walks around his room with ease, plays games with us, speaks, eats and exceeds nearly every expectation we had for him at this stage. The doctors agree. And so in a few hours, we are going home. Is he fully healed? We won’t be able to make that kind of statement for quite a while. Following the surgery, the doctor said she has every reason to believe that this surgery has cured his epilepsy. Is God faithful? I testify today: God is faithful. God is good. I am a father full of joy and thankfulness. We are parents full of praise and relief. We are a family covered in love, hope, and peace.

“Medically speaking: Ezra’s left hippocampus was removed in a ‘textbook perfect’ surgery called a Left Temporal Lobectomy. He now has a circular scar above his left ear about the size of a baseball with a small line in front of his ear. The incision is not stitched. Instead, they use a special ‘super glue’ with antiseptic in it that will hold the skin in place and fall off on its own once the wound is healed. He will have about two weeks of ‘taking it easy’ at home before returning to school and moderate routine activities. It will be about a month before he is riding his bike or jumping on the trampoline. Three months from now, his brain will be fully healed.

“Jade and I have been so incredibly encouraged by our family, friends, and community. We spent the day of surgery with 15-20 who came to sit with us in the waiting room. As other families came and went we sat in waiting for one of the longest surgeries of the day. I can’t imagine going through such a scenario on our own. Community changes everything. As Ezra moved from his post-op bed to the ICU to his recovery room we enjoyed a steady stream of visiting friends with balloons, Legos, cards and meaningful time. Behind the scenes, there were hundreds and hundreds of you praying from all over the world. We are thankful for those who came, those who prayed and all who stood in support of Ezra and our family. Please join us today and praise our Father for what the doctors are calling a ‘textbook perfect surgery’, a ‘perfect CT scan’ and a ‘perfect recovery’. What an awesome, powerful experience this has been.”

Praise God! How wonderful He is to heal! Yesterday, as my nephew Ezra hugged me in my office for longer than expected, my heart rejoiced. It is so good to have him with us, and I am excited to see how Ezra will grow and change as he heals. I can’t imagine the joy Nathan and Jade must be feeling, but their journey, in some ways, has just begun.

ACT: Will you pray for Ezra’s recovery and for the rest of the Metz family as they work together to support him?

Meet the Needs

The difference being made in healthcare in Honduras is amazing, and much of it is due to the needs seen by those serving in Honduras. Missionaries Larry and Angie Overholt have been instrumental in changing the way Honduras meets the medical needs of its people. Read this exciting article from the Spring 2017 issue of The Ohio State University College of Nursing’s Transformations in Nursing & Health magazine. Learn how God is using the Overholts and other missionaries to fulfill a great need.

Creating a school of nursing in Honduras

Two emerita professors and an alumna of the College of Nursing succeed in establishing a new high school of nursing in this Central American nation.

By Jennifer Grabmeier

The idea to revolutionize nursing education in Honduras could be a version of an old adage: Visit a community with high-quality nursing care once a year and its people will benefit for a day; teach high-quality nursing to a community, and their health will improve for lifetimes.

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Photo credit: Overholts

Two emeriti professors from the College of Nursing and an alumna and her fellow Buckeye husband turned that thought into a new nursing school that is the first of its kind in Honduras. It is also an exciting new chapter in the College of Nursing’s ongoing outreach to this Central American country, which started with student study abroad trips in 2000.

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Photo credit: Overholts

Ann Overholt, FNP, ’00, ’05 MS, proposed that first trip to faculty to meet the public health requirement for her BSN. Overholt and her husband, Larry (’79, ’05 MS in agricultural extension education), had lived in Honduras for 18 years working as missionaries and had returned to Ohio State to further their education.

Professor Emerita Kathleen Stone, PhD, RN, FAAN, ’72, agreed to go with her and another student, and after the Overholts returned to Honduras, Stone continued taking students to the southernmost state of Choluteca, where the Overholts live. Professor Emerita Elizabeth Barker, PhD, joined the program when she came to Ohio State in 2003.

The study abroad trips, which included physicians, nurses, pharmacists and Spanish majors who served as translators focused on residents in remote rural areas. Eventually, however, the organizers realized visiting the area once a year was not enough.

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Photo credit: Overholts

“Every year for 17 years we’ve had the College of Nursing outreach and it was great, but over the years we realized we weren’t really changing anything,” said Angie Overholt. “Every year we gave out medicines, but we weren’t really impacting long-term change in their health care. We talked about putting our efforts into training the nurses.”

In Honduras, which has 8.1 million people, there are roughly 8,300 nurses—5,600 of whom are in fact nurse’s aides with only a sixth-grade education. “They are the ones who go out and run the clinics and work in the hospital,” said Stone. “They are the go-to people for nursing.” The other 2,700 nurses are educated at the university level and serve as administrators.

MORE: To read the rest of this article, click the link below.

ACT: Thank you for praying for this ministry, and please continue to pray for impact as school continues. May lives be changed for God’s glory!

https://nursing.osu.edu/assets/Transformations_SP17-web.pdf

This week at the Impact Conference

Impact is the name of this year’s field directors’ retreat at World Gospel Mission. Unlike past years, this year’s conference was planned by some of the missionaries themselves. This week, support staff as well as field leaders are attending the morning Impact sessions in order to better strategize and communicate to double WGM’s impact in the world for Christ.

Field director and co-planner of the event Joy Phillips posted, “I was excited to show Adhanom WGM’s Headquarters today on his first visit to the U.S. He’s standing under the South Sudan flag as our hearts hurt for this country and the war that continues inside its borders.” Missions is so much more than just numbers; it’s about people and understanding the hurts of those in need.

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Photo credit: Joy Philips

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Photo credit: Joy Phillips

Vice President of Mobilization and Communications John Rinehimer posted “Great kick off of week 2 of Impact 2017! — at Indiana Wesleyan University.”

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Photo credit: John Rinehimer

On the first day of this week’s sessions, we started with worship and have had TED-style talks on  passing the baton, making sure we understand how to join and invite multiple cultures into the mission, and the importance of and how to approach doubling our impact for the sake of Christ’s name around the globe. Throughout the week, we will be having many more morning sessions, and we are excited to see what God is going to do through these trainings and discussions.

ACT: We can’t do it without your help. Will you join us in prayer? May God show us the path to take and how we can work with each other and the nations to better impact the world.